Connect with us

World

Donald Trump advocates against abortion A Christian advocacy group will defend “innocent life.”

Published

on

Donald Trump vaguely revisited a topic that Democrats want to center around this year’s presidential contest when he pushed a Christian organization that is adamantly opposed to abortion on Monday.

In a recorded speech, the former president and likely Republican nominee commended the attendees of The Danbury Institute’s gathering, which is being held in Indianapolis in tandem with the Southern Baptist Convention’s annual convention. The recently established institute is a coalition of Christian organizations, churches, and other groups that want to outlaw abortion completely.

On Monday, a group of speakers in person strengthened their opposition to abortion, while a prominent Southern Baptist leader advocated for a staunch stance against in vitro fertilization. IVF is a “commodification of the embryo” that violates human dignity, according to Albert Mohler, president of the main institution affiliated with the SBC. In Alabama, for example, where a state Supreme Court decision declared that frozen embryos are children protected IVF physicians from prosecution and civil lawsuits, he took issue with clergy and politicians who supported the practice.

Mohler stated, “We’re going to discover just how pro-life the pro-life movement is.”

Despite having chosen three of the justices who overruled Roe v. Wade, Trump has often claimed responsibility for the overturning of a federally guaranteed right to an abortion. However, he has refrained from endorsing a nationwide abortion ban, stating that he prefers to leave the decision to the states. Trump disagrees with Mohler and is in favor of IVF access.

Trump commended the crowd for their “tremendous devotion to God and Country” in his taped remarks, adding that everyone must work together to protect their values, which include free speech, religious liberty, the right to life, and America’s history and customs.

“Democrat voting is simply not possible. They oppose religion. Specifically, they oppose your faith,” Trump declared. “You have to go out and vote; you cannot vote for Democrats.”

Republicans in general and Southern Baptists in particular disagree on abortion policy; some favor gradual approaches while others demand outright prohibitions. The majority of Americans, according to polls conducted in recent years, are in favor of some kind of access to abortion. Since Roe v. Wade was reversed, abortion rights organizations have won multiple statewide elections, even ones in states with strong conservative majorities like Kansas and Ohio.

The Southern Baptist Convention, like the Republican Party, has been progressively moving to the right since the 1980s. The organization’s members led the larger religious movement that backed Republican presidents all the way from Ronald Reagan to Donald Trump. One of the sponsors of the event, the Conservative Baptist Network, seeks to advance rightward the conservative denomination.

Despite their criticism of President Bill Clinton’s extramarital affairs during the 1990s, evangelicals, including Southern Baptists, have backed Trump. This has persisted in the face of accusations of sexual misconduct, several divorces, and most recently, his conviction on 34 counts of conspiring to rig the 2016 election by paying hush money to a porn star who claimed to have had sex with him. Trump spoke on the same day he was appearing virtually for a required pre-sentencing interview with New York probation officers.

Advertisement

For many Southern Baptists, he represents the only way out of a Democratic agenda they detest.

The Danbury Institute’s H. Sharayah Colter stated in a statement that Trump has “demonstrated a willingness to protect the value of life even when politically unpopular” and that the presidential contest was a “binary choice.”

Not to be outdone, Mohler, the dean of Louisville, Kentucky’s Southern Baptist Theological Seminary and a former vocal opponent of Clinton, attacked Democrats in a letter following Trump’s conviction for their support of transgender rights.

Whatever you think of Donald Trump’s sex scandals, Mohler wrote, “he doesn’t confuse male and female.” While he criticized Trump’s trial and conviction on Monday, other speakers touched on themes of Christian nationalism—a merging of Christian and American identity.

In an interview, Trump stated that he would not sign a federal law outlawing abortion and that “the people are deciding and in many ways, it’s a beautiful thing to watch” in reference to how certain states are protecting abortion rights while others are restricting them.

Unlike many other Republicans who ultimately dropped out of the race for president, Trump had retreated from supporting any kind of national abortion restriction for more than a year before he made his announcement this spring. Trump has stated time and time again that the topic can be politically complex and that he would “negotiate” a law that would include exceptions for rape, incest, and mother protection.

Democrats and the campaign of President Joe Biden have attempted to link Trump to the most conservative state-level abortion prohibitions in addition to a recent verdict by the Alabama Supreme Court that would have limited access to widely-popular reproductive techniques such as in vitro fertilization.

A spokesman for Joe Biden’s campaign, Sarafina Chitika, stated that “four more years of Donald Trump means empowering organizations like The Danbury Institute who want to ban abortion nationally and punish women who have abortions.” “Trump boasts that he overturned Roe, believes that the severe state prohibitions that are already in place are “working really wonderfully,” and says he will sign a federal ban on abortion if given the opportunity. This November, the stakes are as follows.

Advertisement

A representative for the Trump campaign, Karoline Leavitt, responded to questions over the candidate’s attendance before The Danbury Institute by saying that Trump “has been very clear: he supports the rights of states to determine the laws on this issue and supports the three exceptions for rape, incest, and life of the mother.”

As demonstrated by his recent speech at the Libertarian Convention, his meetings with the unions, and his efforts to campaign in various areas across the nation, Leavitt added, “President Trump is committed to addressing groups with diverse opinions on all of the issues.”

General News Platform – https://ihtlive.com/
Entertainment News Platforms – anyflix.in 
Construction Infrastructure and Mining News Platform – https://cimreviews.com/
Podcast Platforms – https://anyfm.in/

World

During the G7 meeting, Modi and Trudeau interact briefly as tensions over the Nijjar massacre claims rise.

Published

on

Toronto: On Friday, during the G7 leaders’ summit in Apulia, Italy, Prime Minister Narendra Modi and his Canadian counterpart Justin Trudeau had a brief meeting. This was the first time the two leaders had met since Trudeau revealed in the House of Commons on September 18, 2018, that there were “credible allegations” of a possible connection between Indian agents and the three-month-old murder of pro-Khalistan activist Hardeep Singh Nijjar in Surrey, British Columbia.

The meeting was not scheduled by either PM on their official calendar.

Modi shared a picture of the two leaders together on X, none of them seemed to be smiling. A Canadian PMO official was quoted by the Globe and Mail in a statement that stated, “The Prime Minister congratulated Prime Minister Modi on his re-election and the leaders had a brief discussion on the bilateral relationship.” Of course, there are significant problems currently dividing our two nations. We hope you understand that we won’t be releasing any more information at this time,” the statement continued.

On June 5, after Modi was re-elected to a third term, Trudeau’s office released a statement. In that statement, it was said that “Canada stands ready to work together to advance the relationship between our peoples – anchored to human rights, diversity, and the rule of law” as both bilateral and Indo-Pacific partners. “India looks forward to working with Canada based on mutual understanding and respect for each other’s concerns,” was Modi’s response on X four days later.

They had last had a face-to-face meeting in September of last year at the G20 leaders’ conference in New Delhi. It was subsequently revealed that Trudeau had brought up the subject of Nijjar’s murder in that conversation. Trudeau “raised the importance of respecting the rule of law, democratic principles, and national sovereignty,” according to his PMO at the time.

At the time, a statement from the External Affairs Ministry emphasised New Delhi’s “strong concerns about continuing anti-India activities of extremist elements in Canada” while stating that “mutual respect and trust” were crucial for the relationship to advance.

The next meeting of the G7 leaders will take place in Canada in 2025 in Kananaskis, Alberta. As an outreach partner for the earlier events in Italy, Germany, Japan, and the UK, India was invited. But when Canada last hosted the summit in Charlevoix, Quebec, in 2018, India was not invited.

Advertisement

General News Platform – https://ihtlive.com/
Entertainment News Platforms – anyflix.in 
Construction Infrastructure and Mining News Platform – https://cimreviews.com/
Podcast Platforms – https://anyfm.in/

Continue Reading

World

Did the G7 proclamation no longer include abortion or the LGBTQ community? Italy responds

Published

on

Artificial intelligence, the world economy, security and defence, and the ongoing battles in Gaza and Ukraine were the main topics of discussion during the G7 conference in Italy. However, the actual G7 proclamation, which was released to the public on Friday, included no mention of LGBTQ problems or abortion rights.

According to The Guardian, Italy’s far-right government, led by Prime Minister Giorgia Meloni, denied that the G7 declaration’s references to abortion and the LGBTQ community had been eliminated. It should be mentioned that during last year’s G7 conference in Japan, both of these allusions were mentioned in the statement.

The protection of the LGBTQ community’s “gender identity and sexual orientation” was not included in the statement released on June 13, the first day of the summit. The proclamation also omitted the word “abortion.”

The G7 leaders committed to ensuring that women have “universal access to adequate, affordable, and quality health services for women, including comprehensive sexual and reproductive health and rights for all,” even though abortion was not included in the declaration.

The G7 leaders pledged last year to include “access to safe and legal abortion” in Japan’s women’s healthcare system. Bloomberg was the first to report on the loss of LGBTQ rights and abortion, and they connected it to Pope Francis’s participation in the G7 summit.

Meloni’s office was quoted in The Guardian as saying, “There is no basis for the Bloomberg report that suggested that any mention of LGBT rights will be eliminated from the final G7 communiqué. This rebuilding is absolutely denied by the Italian presidency [of the G7].

Meloni and French President Emmanuel Macron have previously spat over allegations that Italy had softened the G7 declaration’s final wording regarding access to safe abortion.

On the fringes of the conference, Macron remarked to an Italian journalist, “You don’t have the same sensibilities in your country.” The French government envisions gender equality, although not all political parties share this goal.

General News Platform – https://ihtlive.com/
Entertainment News Platforms – anyflix.in 
Construction Infrastructure and Mining News Platform – https://cimreviews.com/
Podcast Platforms – https://anyfm.in/

Advertisement
Continue Reading

World

President Cyril Ramaphosa of South Africa is re-elected for a second term following a stunning last-minute coalition agreement.

Published

on

Legislators on Friday re-elected South African President Cyril Ramaphosa to a second term. This came about when his party, hours before the election, forged an unexpected coalition agreement with a former political rival.

In Parliament, African National Congress leader Ramaphosa defeated the unexpectedly nominated Julius Malema of the far-left Economic Freedom Fighters with a decisive win. In the 400-member house, Ramaphosa earned 283 votes to Malema’s 44.

With the support of some smaller parties and legislators from the Democratic Alliance, the nation’s second-largest party, 71-year-old Ramaphosa was able to win a second term. After the African National Congress (ANC) lost its long-held majority in a historic election two weeks ago, reducing it to 159 members in Parliament, they supported him in the vote and helped him over the finish line.

The ANC and the DA inked the last-minute deal during a break in what ended up being an extended parliamentary session, thereby guaranteeing Ramaphosa’s continued leadership of Africa’s most developed economy. In their first national coalition in which no party holds a majority in Parliament, the parties will now share governance of South Africa.

The agreement, known as a government of national unity, unites the ANC with the Democratic Alliance (DA), a white-led party that has long served as the primary opposition and the ANC’s most ardent opponent. Two smaller parties at least joined the deal as well.

The agreement, which thrust South Africa into unknown territory, was hailed by Ramaphosa as a “new birth, a new era for our country” and he urged the involved parties “to overcome their differences and to work together.”

He declared, “This is what we are going to do, and this is what I promise to accomplish as President.”

Since the apartheid system of white minority rule ended in 1994, the ANC, the renowned party of Nelson Mandela, had controlled South Africa with a comfortable majority.

However, in the humiliating national election held on May 29, a pivotal moment for the nation, it lost its 30-year majority. The vote took place in the midst of a general outcry among South Africans due to the country’s high rates of unemployment, inequality, and poverty.

Given the radically divergent philosophies of the ANC, a former liberation movement, and the centrist, business-friendly DA, which received 21% of the vote in the national election—the second-largest percentage after the ANC’s 40%—analysts caution that difficulties may lie ahead.

To start, the DA took issue with the ANC government’s decision to bring a highly sensitive case before the UN Supreme Court, accusing Israel of genocide in Gaza.

The first person to confirm the deal was DA leader John Steenhuisen.

He said, “A deal has been signed, and the DA lawmakers will vote for Ramaphosa for president,” as he left Friday’s sessions to give a speech that was broadcast live on television. “From today, the DA will co-govern the Republic of South Africa in a spirit of unity and collaboration,” he stated.

The Parliament session started at 10 a.m. in the unusual setting of a conference center near Cape Town’s waterfront, after the city’s historic National Assembly building was gutted in a fire in 2022. The house first went through the hours long swearing-in of hundreds of new lawmakers and electing a speaker and a deputy speaker.

Advertisement

The presidential election took place late at night, and the results weren’t made public until well after 10 p.m. As midnight slipped into Saturday, Ramaphosa concluded his acceptance speech.

The MK Party, led by former president Jacob Zuma, boycotted the meeting, although this had little bearing on the results because a quorum only requires a third of the chamber.

Speaking with anyone else who wished to join the unity government, the ANC was willing to listen, according to Secretary-General Fikile Mbalula. He claimed that the multi-party accord will “prioritize the country across the political and ideological divide.” There are eighteen political groups represented in Parliament.

A few parties declined to participate, among them Malema’s EFF.

The Patriotic Alliance, whose leader, Gayton McKenzie, served a prison sentence for bank robbery, and the Inkatha Freedom Party were the other two parties who signed onto the coalition agreement.

McKenzie claimed that just as he had been granted a second shot at life, South Africa now had one as well—a chance to address its severe socioeconomic issues.

After the election results were announced on June 2, Parliament had to vote on the president within 14 days, giving the ANC a deadline to reach a coalition agreement. The final negotiations for a coalition agreement were held over the course of Thursday and Friday, according to party officials, after the ANC had been trying for two weeks to reach one.

Since the African National Congress (ANC) won the first all-race election in 1994 and put an end to over fifty years of racial segregation, South Africa has not experienced such a high degree of political unpredictability. Since then, starting with Mandela, every leader in South Africa has come from the ANC.

Advertisement

The new unity administration also had similarities to the 1994 act of reconciliation when the African National Congress (ANC) held the majority and Nelson Mandela, South Africa’s first Black president, invited political rivals to join a unity government. In his early political career, Ramaphosa had been instrumental in such negotiations.

The ANC’s hand was forced this time.

Leader of the PA McKenzie remarked, “The ANC has been very magnanimous in that they have accepted defeat and said, ‘let’s talk.”

General News Platform – https://ihtlive.com/
Entertainment News Platforms – anyflix.in 
Construction Infrastructure and Mining News Platform – https://cimreviews.com/
Podcast Platforms – https://anyfm.in/

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2023 India Hot Topics. Powered with Passion.